NZ: smartcards, online census

August 13, 2007 at 10:08 pm Leave a comment

Two stories in Computerworld caught my eye today.

First, it seems that Kiwis are going to have to wait longer before the banks roll out smartcards. Blame it on the head start that New Zealand has on minimising credit card fraud using PINs instead of signatures. Another reason is probably the fact that charging credit cards is typically by connecting to backend systems in real time rather than processing paper later.

All of this means that the business case for banks to introduce chip & PIN cards is much harder than in other countries.

It also means that interoperable authentication credentials of the sort I mentioned in a previous post are still far away. That’s not good for anyone.

Secondly, an article quoting Statistics NZ which towards the end mentions, “While only 7% of people completed the census online in 2006, up to 50% have indicated they will be willing to do so in 2011… Feedback from those who did complete online has been very positive.”

That’s quite an impressive prospect- half of the country’s population completing the census online. What a great win for e-government and the Internet that would make!

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Entry filed under: 2FA, authentication, fraud, government, interop, NZ, strategy.

IdenTrust and PKI Re-inventing the Internet

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